When Terry Dorman moved to Quechee, Vermont, in 1980, his plan didn’t include rescuing an abandoned, 100-year-old apple orchard. His mind was on the farm he and his wife, Sara, were planning to build, an idea rooted in the loss of his family’s land in Massachusetts decades earlier. But there it was—rows of gnarled, drooping trees in danger of being reclaimed by the forested hillside. So, he began to experiment with restoration pruning and grafting and soon he was in the orchard in every season, in every kind of weather.

Whitman Brook is the story of an orchard, and also its stewards—Terry and the others who work among the trees. It’s the story of love, of loss, and of rejuvenation through the act of caring for a place that will continue long into the future. And it’s a call to pay attention—to the natural world, to the passing of time, and to each other.

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“A MEDITATION ON TIME; ON CHANGE AND LOSS AND HEALING AND RENEWAL; ON OUR RELATION TO THE NATURAL WORLD; AND ON HOW THEORDINARY AND THE EVERYDAY ARE IN FACT EXTRAORDINARY AND UNIQUE. WE JUST HAVE TO LOOK MORE CLOSELY.”